“Saving the Wild South”: Preserving Biodiversity in the Midst of a Changing Environment

A review of Georgann Eubanks’ book, “Saving the Wild South: The Fight for Native Plants on the Brink of Extinction.”

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Facing the Music: The Ballad of North Carolina’s One-man Crime Wave

A review of Trevor McKenzie’s book, “Otto Wood, the Bandit: The Freighthopping Thief, Bootlegger, and Convicted Murderer Behind the Appalachian Ballads.”

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Margaret Renkl on Revising, Relatability, and Resisting Despair in “Graceland At Last”

An interview with Margaret Renkl regarding her new collection of essays, “Graceland, At Last: Notes on Hope and Heartache from the American South.”

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“Antiman” Takes Us on a Journey through Continents and Identities, Borders Be Damned

A review of Rajiv Mohabir’s new memoir, “Antiman.”

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“Where I Come From” Is Gentle, Full of Charms

Rick Bragg’s collection of essays, “Where I Come From,” is, as he claims in his prologue, about “the South’s gentler, easier nature,” covering everything from Tupperware to pick-up trucks, to pigs’ feet and po’boys.

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“Fight Songs” Explores the South’s History of Racism and its Relationship to Sports

A review of Ed Southern’s new book, “Fight Songs: A Story of Love and Sports in a Complicated South.”

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Looking Beyond the Lines: Suchitra Vijayan’s “Midnight’s Borders”

Suchitra Vijayan’s “Midnight’s Borders,” a book of narrative reportage, raises pertinent questions about the very foundations of India’s nationalism — the cartography of South Asian nation-states.

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Karen Salyer McElmurray’s “Voice Lessons” Finds Beauty in the Broken and Redefines the Self

A review of Karen Salyer McElmurray’s new memoir, “Voice Lessons.”

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