“Late City” Asks If It’s Ever Too Late For Redemption

Imagine Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, only instead of being visited each night by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future, you are visited by God, just one night, on the eve of your death. Instead of seeing what is or what will be, you are exclusively revisiting moments from the past as if…

Read More

“The War for Gloria” Explores the Degeneration of Bodies, Minds, and Ultimately, Lives

A review of Atticus Lish’s new novel, “The War for Gloria.”

Read More

“Antiman” Takes Us on a Journey through Continents and Identities, Borders Be Damned

A review of Rajiv Mohabir’s new memoir, “Antiman.”

Read More

“Where I Come From” Is Gentle, Full of Charms

Rick Bragg’s collection of essays, “Where I Come From,” is, as he claims in his prologue, about “the South’s gentler, easier nature,” covering everything from Tupperware to pick-up trucks, to pigs’ feet and po’boys.

Read More

Ambiguous Meaning of Survival in “Afterparties”

The question of identity is central to each of the nine hard-hitting yet remarkably touching stories in Anthony Veasna So’s debut collection, “Afterparties.”

Read More

“Fight Songs” Explores the South’s History of Racism and its Relationship to Sports

A review of Ed Southern’s new book, “Fight Songs: A Story of Love and Sports in a Complicated South.”

Read More

Big Cats, Bigger Questions: The Lions and Legal Dilemmas of “Pride of Eden”

A review of Taylor Brown’s novel, “Pride of Eden.”

Read More

“The Blue Line Down” Is a Tale of New Beginnings

Maris Lawyer’s debut novel, “The Blue Line Down,” is set in 1920s Appalachia, featuring coal miners, union busters, and bootleggers.

Read More